Should Sellers Pay for Their Own Inspection?

From personal experience I see both sides of the question as to whether or not a seller should get a home inspections prior to listing their home for sale.  My personal opinion is that it will help significantly reduce potential issues down the road that might be found by the buyers and give both parties full disclosure of the property prior to closing an escrow. Ultimately this will help make the transaction smoother on both sides. Both seller knowing the condition and electing to fix it or just disclose it and buyers feeling more comfortable that the home is well taken care of.   IMHO… Dawn

For homeowners considering a move, some experts are recommending they get a home maintenance inspection before they list their home for sale. Such an inspection can provide a full picture of any repairs that need to be done before they become negotiating points in a transaction.

Pre-Listing Inspections Put Sellers in Control

Steve Wadlington, president of WIN Home Inspection, explains how sellers can avoid potential conflict with buyers and gain an edge in negotiations. Read more.

A home maintenance inspection is similar to a home inspection that is done by buyers, says Frank Lesh, president of the American Society of Home Inspectors. A licensed inspector can check on the main systems of the home, such as the roof, walls, foundation, HVAC, electrical, and plumbing.

“You might not even notice a problem [with your home],” says Lesh. An inspector may be able to spot small problems before they become bigger, more expensive problems. They can also advise clients on the regular maintenance tasks they should be doing on their home to keep everything in tip-top shape.

An inspector can walk homeowners around the property to show them any potential problems they spot. Homeowners will receive a report that details anything the inspector finds as well, which can serve as a to-do list to address, if they so wish.

“Every three to five years, you should have a home inspector come out and do a maintenance inspection,” advises Lesh. “Like changing your furnace filter, you should do it before it gets so bad [that it becomes] a problem. … A home inspector isn’t trying to sell you anything … and isn’t going to make any money off doing the repairs.”

The cost of a home maintenance inspection varies by the size of the home but can average $200 to $400.

Source: “What Is a Home Maintenance Inspection? A Health Checkup for Your House,” realtor.com® (May 8, 2018)

About Dawn O'Neal

Dawn O'Neal - WASHINGTON - Realogics Sotheby's International Realty - Managing Broker CALIFORNIA - Independent Broker~Owner~REALTOR® GRI, CRS, LTG®, RRC®, PMN® ASP®, e-PRO®, SRES®, CIPS, TRC®,SFR®, CHS®, CDPE®, Ombudsman and Trained in Negotiations & Mediation from Pepperdine University School of Law I have been self employed since 1975, a REALTOR® since 1990. I am a member of the Sequim Association of REALTORS® IN WASHINGTON and WAR® plus Santa Clara County Association of REALTORS® and CAR® in CALIFORNIA Plus NAR®. I work predominantly with residential clients, some commercial properties, 1031 exchanges, & extensively with Seniors. I have received many awards with RE/MAX and Realty World attaining both their top award of Hall of Fame & earned many designations. I love to work with clients in person or through emails & the Internet. Please visit my web page www.DawnOneal.com for a full profile, testimonials & my passion – Breakfast With Santa. CA DRE#01101500 WA License #26510 My Motto - Exceeding Expectations - ALWAYS!
This entry was posted in Buyers, Buying a Home, For Sale By Owner, Inspections, Personal Opinions, Real Estate - Sellers & Buyers, REALTOR®, Remodel, Safety, Seller Disclosure and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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